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opportunities that, you hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. studies have shown that throughout the united iowa, that also in all growth in workforce in the 30 years will be attributable to immigrants. because of this demographic of retiring baby-boomers and the after them.oming and, of course, also, i think, alluded to, we also need to fill jobs that are currently here. need to create jobs, we need innovation. this is where immigrants have contributed to america as well. immigrants are more likely as a roup to start businesses, immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they're high-tech the industries and that than native foreign counterparts. and then finally, we have to we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from rest of the world. economy.'s true for our and so therefore our economy is sum game. our workforce is not a zero sum game. usinesses and workers adapt to changing policies and circumstances. so we work with the rest of the a sense we're in competition for the rest of the world. or exports, imports, and workforce. so immigration from the business sh
" bankht an intern for bank of america found dead after working nearly three straight days. police a defense lawyer says the jury is stacked against this teenager who is charged with shooting a baby between the eyes right in front of his mother. >> i can't believe that they could shoot a baby in the face. >> shepard: the defense claims the accused killer is not getting a fair trial. >> one black male on a panel of 48 people. >> shepard: tonight, the push to start over and the ruling from a judge. plus police say three teenagers were bored so they decided to cale college student for fun. >> it was well thought out. >> something -- >> >> shepard: we will hear from the mother of one of the suspects. and high school students claim they are uncovered an oreo ripoff. >> it looks like the stuffing on the double stuff is slightly less than a real double stuff oreo. >> double stuff is less than oreo. >> tonight the cookie company responds. but first from fox this tuesday night. a 21-year-old intern at bank of america collapsed and died after he reportedly worked three back-to-back shifts of
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
a massive outbreak of measles in america. well, some people are blaming some christian teachings. >>> and a montana teacher is convicted of raping a 14-year-old student. why did the teacher only get 30 days in jail? days in jail? >>> let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >p >>> "outfront>>> "outfrn drumbep drumbeat to wdrurn drumbep drumbeat to wdrum louder. wall street suffered its worst day since june as the obama administration clearly laid the groundwork for a possible military strike on syria. >> there's no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian regime. the president believes and i believe that those who use chemical weapons against defenseless men, women and children should and must be held accountable. >> market analyst todd schoenberger is "outfront" with us tonight. thank you for being here. how much of the drumbeat you heard from the vice president and the president and the administration about oil in the region? >> quite a bit because it's a grave concern for everybody at wall street. it was top of mi
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
supports the nsa surveillance program. he says the program itself works in protecting america from terrorism and has what he calls a 99.99% batting average in being compliant. >> this whole tone of snooping and spying that we use i think it's horrible, it's a distortion and a smear and a slander of good patriotic americans. >> reporter: senator rand paul, by the way, says the constitutionality of the nsa program must be evaluated. steve? >> thank you very much. peter king went directly at rand paul, said basically he's lying about the program. and he's just breathless in defending it as michael hayden. where is the president? he doesn't go to pat for this. he's analyzing this and it's his program. from michael hayden he says "the washington post" publishes this story. look at the numbers. there's been 115 incidents, incorrectly entered. mistakes made. none intentional. so that's out of 61 million inquiries a compliance rate of 99.998. look beyond the numbers and the headlines. >> right. michael hayden has and i temple in the "usa today" today where he talks in an op-ed just trust u
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, and will be replaced by al jazeera america. in our time here in "the war room" we have focused on important political stories from our march goes on series, to controlling the playing of gun violence in this country and the immigration reform debate that continues to rage on. joining me now inside "the war room" are two of my current colleagues and friends, john fugelsang, the host of "viewpoint, who has the second best hair on this network, and my very close friend, "the young turks" studio in los angeles cenk uygur. thank you both for joining us in "the war room" one last time. >> thank you, michael. >> thank you. >> michael: john, i'm sgoorth with you what do you think the impact that current tv has had on the progressive discussion if any at all? >> well, that's a good question. i have to say it was positive, if not necessarily profound. while this whole experience has proven that liberals are very good at capitalism, i'm very happy for mr. gore, i don't think network had the chance to make the proper impact it could have had had it had proper promotions behind it. i think if we would have had a
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
of the united states of america" is a biography and portrait of each first lady. it is now available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping and can be found at c- span.org/products. the c-span town hall meeting that discusses the future of political parties. following that, nancy pelosi. after that, a town hall meeting with senator john mccain. >> this is a c-span townhall. you good tos away, have more of your say. during congress's recess, tuesday, wednesday, and thursday night on c-span, we are looking at public politics and talking to you about positions. welcome to c-span town hall tonight. we will ask you about the future of your political party. who is the future leader, the likely presidential candidate, and maybe it is somebody that is not necessarily yet on the national scene. a couple of ways for you to participate, by phone. we will open up the lines now. make sure you mute your television and radio when you call in. you can also use twitter. we will read tweets from members of congress who are back in their home states and districts for the august recess. some p
is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no business giving them our money. i thank you very much. hubie: thank you, shane. from maryland. our next caller from ports myth, howe. good morning. caller: good morning. i enjoy your program here. just a quick comment about what's going on in egypt. people don't realize that they it -- america a pretty much put the president there before, and they lived under, generally, what america -- with freedom. now they have this muslim brotherhood guy who came in here and tried to slowly bring back shari'a law to this country. they'll people are
, or you will not have a relationship with the united states of america. >> i spoke with the former secretary of state last week. she's having a very good new life. she's teaching at stamford enjoying golf and having a chance to thing about the world from a very different perspective. >> good to hear it. i know we're going to see more of that. >> she talks about iran's new president and what's going on in syria and john kerry's attempt at the peace process. >>> one person is missing after a flash flood swept through colorado. a heavy rain triggered the floods in manitou springs. kelly werthmann of our denver affiliate tells how one thing led to another. >> this is the most terrifying thing i've ever seen. i can't stop shaking. >> reporter: amateur video caught this late friday gushing at speeds of up to 30 miles an hour. the flash flooding brought on by a torrential downpour turned roadways is into raging rapids in a manner of minutes. >> our car just floated away. others are floating away now. >> reporter: firefighters rescued this man from a swoling cree
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
all you have to say about the topic. >> that's it for us. america live with martha begins right now. >> fox news alert. just months in president obama's second term and guess what, attention is turning to iowa, to the 2016 presidential field if you can believe it. we have several political hitters who made moves as possible presidential candidate. welcome to america live i am markka mccowen in for megyn kelliy. >> hillary clinton is giving a speech later today as she gets a lot of early attention as the democratic front runner in 2016, vice-president boyd boyd making waves out there. he accepted an invite to speak in iowa next month. texas senator ted cruz and rick sanatorium and danald trump hit up the iowa state fair this weekend. boy, oh, boy, joining us is mr. chris stalwart. what dow make of all of this. >> you make it sound like it is my fault. i didn't do. this i am not making them run for office. this is the world we live in today. you want to run for the highest office in the land, it never ends and never stops and the permanent campaign is an understatement and if you want
the safest big city in america. and i'm happy to say we are on pace for another record low of shootings and homicides this year. because our police officers follow the law and follow the crime. they fight crime wherever crime is occurring and at the don't worry if their work doesn't match-up to a census chart. >> governor, this is a big part of his legacy. he doesn't want to leave office with the record he has intact and all of a sudden be remembered as the guy implementing stop and frisk on an unconstitutional basis >> he should be remembered to the man who helped reduce violent crime to historic levels in this city. we have an seen a decline across the country but haven't seen anything like the dramatic decline in new york city. you can trash new york city where we will very policing including stop and frisk with chicago where the rate of minority murders in that city is just unacceptable. share lynn is also right when you look at the sticks. look at the statistics of stop and frisk. it reflects basicallity percentages of those hose ultimately are arrested and charged with crimes in t
. >> you next time? >> that's right. that's my new role in america. >> in all that matters. >> a panda family reunion in china. this adorable giant panda cub was reintroduced to her mother last week. she was born july 6th but taken away when her leg was hurt. >> on "cbs this morning." >> the executives at blackberry are considering selling off the company. it's being called a very lucrative move by six years ago magazine. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" and good morning, norah. >> good morning to you charlie. >> lots of interesting stories this morning. we begin with this new concerns that al qaeda is on the move. the iraq al qaeda group has changed its name to the islamic state of iraq to show their growing ambition. >> and there are growing fears syria is to become the new haven for terrorists. they warn it could create the world's great eterror threat. lara logan, good morning. >> good morning, norah, good morning, charlie. >> how dangerous is al qaeda in syria and what are you worried about? >> dangerous enough for the deputy di
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
of the united states of america siding with the generals. we have no credibility. we do have influence, but when you don't use that influence, then you do not have that influence. we could be cutting off the aid, the spare parts and maintenance of these military equipment that we've given the egyptians is important to their capabilities. >> wait -- >> tourism, economic assistance, business, the imf loan. there are many areas where we could exercise influence over the generals and we're not doing any of it and we're not sticking with our values. >> and yet when you argued earlier, trying as you say to give the military leaders a chance, you argued that to cut off u.s. aid to egypt might harm israel. others also add that once you cut off aid, you've lost any kind of leverage. there is nothing after you've cut u.s. aid. >> well, again, we thought that at that particular time that it was not the right thing to do because we wanted to give them an opportunity to get back on the path to democracy. obviously that's not the case. as i say, our interests, our values, there are consequences of failure --
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ at 712 left turn it over to traffic with the george who is on the phones getting the latest with these hot spots. we're talking about that's stalled big grid. it looks like it is gone now. it was a dead center in the shot. >>george: the big rig just pulled off about one-and-a- half minutes ago so the upper deck is not clear but the damage has been done. take a look at the back up at the toll plaza reaching all the way into the macarthur made and drive times are running over 30 minutes on every approach. more when the kron4 morning news returns. ♪ (woman) this place has got really good chocolate shakes. (growls) (man) that's a good look for you. (woman) that was fun. (man) yeah. (man) let me help you out with the.. (woman)...oh no, i got it. (man) you sure? (woman) just pop the trunk. (man vo) i may not know where the road will lead, but... i'm sure my subaru will get me there. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>george: welcome ba
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
the case for putting america's house in order" and in washington columnist for bloomberg view al hunt. start off talking about a-rod, look tat the front page of "the new york post," a-roid rage has the last laugh in the sixth inning. >> i will say i'm a red sox fan, interest of full disclosure. these are the things that can turn a season around. when the red sox won the series in '04 that spat with jason vary tech and a-rod where vary tech took it to a-rod when he seemed bigger than the game turned his season around. if he gets to play out the rest of the year it's big for the yankees. >> also something wrong with the rules of baseball. after the pitcher goes after a-rod, the idea he's not tossed out of the game, both teams equally warned, that's outrageous. girardi was right, should not have been thrown out of the game. the pitcher should have been thrown out of the game. >> i thought it was just pitching him inside. >> don't you love that? >> what are you talking about? >> crowding the plate and he clearly threw a few balls and a-rod stepped into one. >> no funny business there. >>
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
will have to do it without america's closest ally. last night britain's closest parliament said no to military action. >> this morning, u.n. inspectors inside syria are finishing their investigation into last week's attack that killed hundreds. elizabeth palmer has made her way into syria. we also have mark phillips in london and major garrett in washington. but we begin with elizabeth in damascus who went out this morning with those u.n. inspectors. elizabeth. >> they left the hotel and made a couple ss actually. it looked as if they wanted to go back ton the suburbs they visited earlier in the week the site of wednesday's attack but turned back. maybe because there was heavy shelling. i can hear the artillery now as i sit in the studio. it's been going on all morning. so instead, we followed them to the military hospital where they were going to talk to six soldiers also allegedly suffering from the effects of chemical poisoning or some sort of toxin. maybe soldiers who were on the road blocks around those suburbs that were hit last wednesday or perhaps
of the united states of america. >> the conservative family leadership summit ended yesterday in iowa after party leaders all took the stage. donald trump, who was once again considering his own presidential bid, was also there in iowa. this is what he said about the 2012 election. >> i like mitt romney personally. i think he's a very good guy. i don't know what the hell happened with his campaign. i just don't get it. that was an election that couldn't have been lost. it couldn't have been lost. >> donald trump in iowa. let's get right to the brain trust. goldie taylor, and the managing editor of the goldie taylor project. and also an msnbc contributor and political editor for the grio. and the daily caller writes for u.s. news and world report. good to have all of you with us on a sunday afternoon. goldie, the fallout from the nsa leaks by edward snowden, cancellation of talks with russia's president vladimir putin. it has put u.s. relations with russia under a microscope. senator john mccain said this morning that be russia has no interest in maintaining a good relationship with the unit
: for "good morning america," aditi roy, abc news, new york. >> thank you, aditi. >>> now, to an abc news exclusive. a truly remarkable story. the fbi is, in fact, looking for your help this morning. reopening an almost half-century-old mystery. kidnapping and mistaken identity. a remarkable story coming to light thanks to months of work by our barbara walters. barbara here with us this morning. and this all started when a newborn was stolen from a hospital in chicago. >> that's right. and by the way, you mentioned my colleagues. this is the abc investigative unit. and we're very big. imagine a mother whose baby is stolen out of her arms. she gets the baby back. or so she thinks. and now, almost 50 years later, that son she raised has come forward to speak exclusively to us. looking at old family photographs of paul fronczak is a strange experience. because the baby in his baby pictures is not him. how do you feel when you see this picture? >> i feel like i want to find him and hug him and make sure he's okay. >> reporter: paul fronczak recently discovered his entire life, his name, his p
, the boston southy turned crime boss turned fbi informant turned man on the run as one of america's most wanted. nbc's kristen dahlgren is outside the federal courthouse in boston. kristen, this was a 32-count indictment. break down the findings for us. some of the murders he was found guilty of, some of them he was not. >> reporter: yeah, these -- they all fell sort of under this racketeering charge, which is a catch all. there were 19 murders. he was found guilty of committing or being co-conspirator in 11 of them. this all during the time when he was reported to be an fbi informant. we're now hearing outside of the courthouse from some of the victims' families. we heard from pat donahue. her husband michael was one of the murders that was proven in this case. she says today she really feels like she got justice. we also heard from steven davis. he's been very vocal through all of this. his sister debra was murdered, but that was the one charge that was found no finding. so it wasn't proven or not proven. the jury just couldn't reach a finding on that. so he was understandably disappoi
that the election for that senate seat is going to be held in october? on a wednesday. here in america, we generally hold big statewide, big federal elections on tuesdays in november. wednesday in october? and, in fact, new jersey already has a previously scheduled big statewide election on a tuesday this november. a big normal election on a big normal election day. tuesday in november. but the u.s. senate seat election between cory booker and the former mayor is going to be held on a different day, less than three weeks before the normal election day on a wednesday. why? because on that tuesday in november, real election day, new jersey governors chris christie, is on the ballot. he's running for re-election as new jersey governor, and as he is making the state of new jersey spend an extra $12 million to hold a whole separate election for this senate seat, less than three weeks before there's going to be an election anyway. amazing. presumably he is going this because he does not want to be on the same ballot with a democrat as popular as cory booker. there is basically no one in politics who think
why that's happening. because nobody in america would -- dan, good luck. we will see you soon. if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." stick around. the fix is next. >>> day of rage. egypt's unrest leads to hundreds of deaths and thousands of injuries prompting president obama to cancel a major military exercise. is there more the u.s. will do to stop the violence? plus, some new names headlining in the hawkeye state talk this weekend. but the spotlight still belongs to the superstars on each side. and another surprise headline on what the nsa is up to. an internal review shows the intel outfit broke its own rule thousands times. good morning from washington. it's friday, august 16th, 2013. and this is "the daily rundown." we're watching developing news out of egypt. the country bracing for more bloodshed today. tens of thousands of muslim brotherhood members and their supports are responding to calls for a day of rage. pouring into the streets to protest this week's brutal government crackdown. we're watching crowds demonstrators crossing a bridge through cairo. most likely tryin
forcing -- there is an organizing i'm advising calling the compact for america trying to get a balanced budget amendment and get a convention call a nifty idea to control a run away convention. there are policy innovations that states are trying to put together, again, across a host of areas left, right, which is trying to reassert the original dynamic. not nullify. states cannot say federal law is no good. just to rebalance the power in the country. host: ian, can you speak to federal effort pushing back? if that's the way right to look at this. what is or what can the federal government do once states put these efforts into place? guest: if we are talking about an actual nullification law, that's when the state tries to forbid the federal government from forcing its own law, those laws are void almost automatically. guest: john c. calhoun is probably roaming the studios right now. guest: the federal official would try to enforce the law, presumably the state would try to stop them. and then it would be very easy for the federal government to get a court order to say that the state can
coconut today. america runs on dunkin'. pretzels! [loudly] no, thanks! pretzel roll from dunkin'. try the new pretzel roll sandwiches from dunkin' -- get any bakery sandwich on a soft, warm pretzel roll today. america runs on dunkin'. >> time to get to your answers to our water cooler question of the day. >> some interesting answers this morning. this morning we asked, do you think a judge should have the right to change a child's first name? >> thank you for sending in your responses this morning. >> here are some stories you'll find at 7:00 a.m. on wbal plus. back to school shopping in full swing. tips from some experts on the best new gadgets for your students. feline put on the path. that is a fatcat. a huge kitty. >> you think he would run after some mice? >> he is really big. >> we would have to change the name of that. [laughter] busy from little harford county. southbound 95, we have an accident just prior to aberdeen. railroad gates are broken a long time money and road. police are directing -- railroad gates are broken along timonium road. looking pretty good at padonia roa
disagree with his lifestyle choices, he's out there protecting the united states of america, he deserves your respect. >> and you know what, guts. that's what this all boils down to. what we're all talking about. it's just speaking out. mike allen, mike, we started with you. i was just talking about since 2006, republicans have grimaced and hidden in the corners and they've -- oh, what are we going to do about -- these people on talk radio, these people on cable news that are saying these things that are driving off the very swing voters we need to get elected to the white house again. >> yeah. >> guts. they don't have guts to speak out against the treex emmists. mitt romney never had the guts to speak out against the most extreme elements in his party. and he lost in part because he followed extremists down a rabbit hole in iowa, in a caucus process, on immigration, and he got slaughtered among hispanic-americans because of it and he got beaten in other areas too because he never spoke out and had that famous bill clinton sister soldier moment that by the way conservatives cheered when
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